Upcoming shows include my Artwork

Oh my god this has been a busy summer and now fall…I can’t wait to catch my breath, but there’s no end in sight until after The Clayfolk Show coming up November 22nd-24th at the Medford Armory on Hwy. 99 just off exit 27. Anyone wanting to take me to a warm sunny locale, just drop a line. I’m ready! SAMSUNG

I’m working on some new functional pieces since I’m learning to throw on the potters wheel, and I hope they’ll be well received. SAMSUNG These bowls are in the greenware stage-unfired and unglazed. The colors will change dramatically before they’re completed. The pastels will become deep reds and bright yellows and glowing greens. The outsides will become black and white. It one of the cool things about doing ceramics. You can’t tell until it comes out of the kiln on the final firing what it will look like. That’s part of the mystery of clay work. SAMSUNG

In the background is my reclining nude chaise lounge called “Eve”. It’s temporarily taking up space in my studio and serving as another shelf! Lol. I would love to sell her… anyone interested should contact me NOW! I need the studio space back and she needs a better home.

Stay tuned for updates on the progress of these new works as November draws nearer.

While going back and forth to Portland I was also working on some new garden art to be shown this October at the Illahe Gallery in Ashland, Oregon. The pieces shown will be the Mosaic Town I created this summer and blogged about earlier.  The opening reception will take place Oct. 4th from 5-8 pm for the First Friday art walk in Ashland. Come on down to Illahe at 4th and B Street and meet me and other great mosaic artists from the area and check out the variety of types and styles that mosaics can offer.

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Shows & Events                                                   October 2013
Gallery Newsletter
Historic Charles Nininger Building
215 Fourth Street
Ashland, Oregon  97520

 

 OCTOBER:

We are happy to bring an eclectic group of nine skilled mosaic artists to the gallery this month for our Third Annual Mosaic Invitational.   Each of these artists skillfully takes the craft of mosaic in a unique direction and form, from furniture to wall hanging to outdoor sculptural works.  Join us for the Artists’ Reception, held during Ashland’s First Friday Art Walk on October 4th  from 5~8 p.m.  Enjoy a late summer evening stroll with other art lovers and meet the artists.  Wine and light refreshments will be served along with the music of Jef Ramsey.

THIRD ANNUAL MOSAIC INVITATIONAL:

Joanne Chase

Kory Dollar

Tina Ellis

Jennifer Kuhns

Jill McAlvage Smith

Penny Meads

Mimi Near

Karen Rycheck

Wilma Wyss

October 1-26

 

“Phalaenopsis” Joanne Chase

First Friday Artist Reception

Friday, October 3rd 5-8 pm


“Resonance” Joanne Chase: ::::: :

 

JOANNE CHASE

I love to immerse myself in all aspects of the world of plants, growing edibles and ornamentals, walking amongst wild flowers, harvesting for food and medicine. Orchids are amazing flowers with such complex and unlikely architecture. Our local natives are miniscule and grow from the ground while tropical orchids such as I’ve recently seen in Panamaattach themselves to trees and have bigger, showy flowers. They all delight me and have inspired this body of work along with the notion of resonance, something that evokes a strong emotion, such as these flowers do for me.

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“Zahara, Goddess of Dance” Kory Dollar: ::::: :

 

KORY DOLLAR

Kory Dollar is a stained glass mosaic artist of Clark County Washington. She has been creating colorful mosaics for 15 years and is a self-taught artist. Kory uses a wide range of materials to create mosaics; she searches for unique bits and pieces that can be turned into treasures. She places bits of color and texture together to create elements in nature and fantasy. All of the items she creates are one-of-a-kind. She assembles each work of art one piece at a time, making every piece just right. Kory uses a broad range of materials, combining texture, reflectivity, and spacing to create her vision. Kory shapes the materials to fit like puzzle pieces, using modern tools. She is intrigued by mandalas, nature, and the human body. Her visions come from her surroundings; “I watch nature and people, studding movement, expression, tone, and light. My aspirations allow my imagination to create vivid themes and expression for others to interpret.”

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“Classic Ribbon Vase” Tina Ellis

TINA ELLIS

After representing glass artists to galleries for eight years, Tina found herself compelled to create her own artwork. She was inspired to work with dichroic glass because of its lively and reflective light transmitting qualities. The glass she uses is predominantly recycled. Tina hand cuts and fuses each piece of glass creating soft pillowed pieces for her mosaics. She also slumps some pieces of the molten glass to fit the form on which she is working.

This exhibit is a series of mosaic vases. Most of the vases are recycled period pieces. Tina’s work contrasts classical shapes with contemporary materials. She loves the way these contrasting elements play off of each other creating an entirely different expression.

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“Gimli” Jennifer Kuhns

JENNIFER KUHNS

My specialty is stained glass mosaic, with emphasis on use of reclaimed materials.  I collect stained glass scraps from leaded and fused glass artists, tiles are scavenged from contractors, tile setters, and salvage yards.  The bases for my fine art panels are leftover tile boards, cupboard doors, and old windows.

Throughout my life, faces have been the primary focus of my artwork.  If I’m stuck waiting in a line or at an airport, I entertain myself by sketching the faces of the people around me.  I love how different all of our faces are, and yet so similar.  The lines and contours of a face tell a story.  The arch of an eyebrow or clenching of a jaw can completely change a person’s expression.

While I have always enjoyed sketching realistic faces, I began to play with use of unexpected colors in my twenties, working in oil pastel.  From there, my faces became more and more whimsical as I also worked in linocut and collage, and when I discovered mosaic, I began by translating many of my earlier designs using tile and glass.

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“More Orange Bubbles” Jill McAlvage Smith

JILL McALVAGE SMITH

My sisters accuse me of having enough Scrabble tiles to write a novel. I don’t. But almost.

I am a finder, a collector, a bricoleur. Each of my artistic journeys begins with the hunt. I can be found most weekends haunting yard sales, imagining new lives for the dusty treasures I unearth.

I am passionate about creating my artworks using entirely salvaged and found materials (with the notable exception of adhesive and grout). My creative process begins with those discarded items. I am inspired by the challenge of transforming these rescued and reclaimed objects into meaningful works of art.

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“Rooster” Penny Meads

PENNY MEADS

Mosaic art creating for me is a form of mental therapy.  When working on a piece I can clear my mind of everything and find relaxation in creating a piece.  I have taught myself over many years and consider myself an advanced amateur.  When asked to describe how I do this, I describe it as having a vision and working backwards like a jigsaw puzzle.

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“Joy of Joys” Mimi Near

MIMI NEAR

I fell in love with glass mosaic the moment I encountered this intrepid art form in the Cathedrals of Europe at age 13. Using the technical skills I gained from being a journeyman tilesetter, the understanding of mosaic art from my studies inRavennaItaly and various art and design classes I set out to explore the inner and outer world of mosaic art. I create mosaics for Public Art Installations as well as private residence installations such as water features, sculptural interior or exterior pieces, bathrooms, kitchens, terraces etc. I also create what could be considered “Fine Art” that is hung as a painting would be hung in one’s home. The pieces I have created for this show have been inspired by a variety of things, my recent exploration of Spain, my love of the natural world and my absolute infatuation with the creation process.

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“Mosaic Houses” Karen Rycheck

Exploring different subject matters and concepts ranging from light to dark and whimsical to weighty drives my art making.

I begin a work with a general concept, giving myself space to develop the piece as I’m interacting with it. Allowing myself more room to play in my abstract work, I focus on design, texture and color as my guides.

Different materials call to me for each individual piece, so various types of glass, clay, stone, and metal as well as non-traditional materials such as CD’s and LP’s may all be found in my work. Choosing not to limit myself by material, I select my medium according to what sense I want to convey in the piece itself.

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“Out to Sea” Wilma Wyss

WILMA WYSS

The different settings and cultures that I’ve experienced are reflected in my mosaic work. My childhood was a multicultural gyre: I was raised by Swiss parents in the U.S. and Africa, and often felt like an outsider, spiraling between continental divides. I’m inspired by the lively, colorful ornamentation in African culture that often draws from nature, even as it collides in my art with the Swiss tradition of orderliness and precision-a collision I hope infuses my work with intriguing contrasts and a dichotomy of order and the unexpected. As a resident of the Bay Area for 25 years, I also feel a strong connection to the western landscape, and often integrate natural materials in my work, including river rock, pebbles, beach glass, fossils and shells. Color, texture and shape are key. I enjoy the technical challenges in creating my mosaic work, whether applying the mosaic to a substrate that I cast in concrete, build up an armature of wire mesh, or repurpose an old frame or ceramic roof tile.

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Fabrication of Astoria Mosaic Complete!

Session three had finally arrived for me. After a busy start to my week, during which we held the first Talent Art Forum for the Talent Public Arts Committee, I arrived in Hillsboro two weekends ago at 10 pm to find an almost completed mosaic.P1000413

These were the last 3 sections that remained to be done.P1000420

The first morning I was there, Sandy and I quickly knocked out the first section, with Lynn’s  help.

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Lynn is here, with the first section, and the second, prior to fitting into the mosaic.P1000421

With only one more section to go we are feeling pretty good, as we still have 2 days of my visit left.

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The mosaic after sections one and two are added. The excitement is building for the final bit.

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The final section well on it’s way while Lynn and Bob celebrate their anniversary out on the town in Portland.

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And finally the last piece goes in.

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Next morning, we fitted the final piece, and here is the mosaic with all the main work done!

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Lynn does some finessing in joint spaces to make sure everything looks good and fits well.

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Me adding the last of the outside edge to the medallion.

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Here’s a closeup of one of the sturgeon’s whiskers.P1000438

Lynn with the completed mosaic, ready for installation after her return from Italy.lynnadamo-rickpaulsonphoto-sep-2013-8504

The whole team who helped create this masterpiece.

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Celebrating completion with a bottle of wine on one of the prettiest days of the weekend-a last hurrah before fall sets in.

The mosaic is scheduled to be installed in late October. Can’t wait to see the park completed! If you visit Astoria don’t miss it, the Garden of Surging Waves, and be sure to let us know what you think.

Mosaic sturgeon will be brightening up Astoria- Part 2

Back up in Hillboro this past week for more work on the Astoria project with Lynn Adamo and her faithful minions.

When I arrived the fish were all completed except for a little eye surgery (later) and the watery background was begun.P1000376

Lynn’s order of blue smalti from Mexico had been delayed by U.S. Customs and had just arrived in the middle of last week when artists’ Richard Davis and Jennifer Kuhns were just leaving.  So Lynn was anxious to get going with the background and cover some ground (literally).

However, we had a limited amount of certain blue colors we were using as accents. The only way we could figure out to evenly distribute them throughout the piece was to scatter them loosely across the template, then bag them up and label them according to the sections they would end up in. The system may look weird, but it was fairly quick and effective.

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Layout of fish with accent colors evenly distributed.

Notice the eyes of the fish in the photo above…somewhat ghostlike…

As I lay more of the blue field, Lynn began her “eye surgery”.

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“Eye-ectomy” being perfomed on the first fish.

We decided the eyes needed more of a true pupil to make them a bit more animated and alive, so we trimmed out the existing center,

P1000384  Added a few darker tiles,…

P1000401 …and voile! A much more lively fish.

In addition to these minute tasks, we also decided to make a new template that was fully laminated and protected from the weather, as our previous one was getting a bit soggy in the rain, and shrinking as a result (!) making it difficult to get an accurate measure and fit for our MANY sections of mosaic on mesh.

That took up some of my evening and half of the next day to do- working on the kitchen floor and in the front room in sections until I got it all done. We then moved it out onto the back porch and transferred all the completed mosaic sections to it and taped them down so they wouldn’t shift – ensuring a better fit later when it’s installed.

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Taping the sections together to avoid shift during fitting.

Lynn was very meticulous with keeping things organized and clean during the whole process- and you have to! One little sliver of misplaced smalti can throw off the whole thing.

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Cleaning up the shards of glass, bits of dirt (no shoes here!), and other detritus blown in from the yard.

By the time I left Friday morning we had fitted all the mesh for the next sections, gotten a little further on the blue field, and had the planning behind us so Lynn could move forward more quickly and easily to completion. (Or so I like to think!)

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Slowly but surely…and looking beautiful!

I’ll be going back up at the end of next week for the final push…and will keep updating as we progress…

But be sure to keep up with the progress of this project for the Garden of Surging Waves in Astoria, Oregon on Lynn’s blog at www.lynnadamo.com/blog/ too!

Mosaic sturgeon will be brightening up Astoria- Part 1

Hello good peoples of the internet! I would like to introduce you all to a wonderful mosaic artist, a fabulous pie baker, and an all around awesome human being- and they all exist in the person that is Lynn Adamo of Hillsboro, Oregon.

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Lynn enjoying her pie and ice cream

It’s hard to believe, but Lynn is all that and more.

She recently won a commission from the City of Astoria to do a 10 foot diameter mosaic to be placed in a new park in the heart of Astoria.
The premise of the park is to honor the immigrants who helped build our great Northwest as well as honor a bit of the natural history of Astoria to boot.
The sturgeons depicted in Lynn’s mosaic are representing the fish canning industry that helped make Astoria prosperous.

Mexican smalti “tortillas” (thick, richly colored slabs of glass) were created specifically for this project and are being laid by many hands under the direction of Lynn.
She has created a veritable hive (or swarm?!) of worker bees from which to draw on when the projects get large, and/or the time window for completion is short.

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Janie prepping smalti “B” cuts for installation

I am lucky enough to be one of the happy drones working on this gorgeous endevour.

I first went up to Hillsboro (home of Intel) around the 3rd or 4th week into the project. When I arrived things were well underway with one fish completed and another begun.

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I  worked with Sandy Arbogast, Jan, and Scott over three full days-and we made some respectable progress, finishing the second sturgeon

P1000345 and starting the third.

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The meals were fantastic during my first visit too. P1000353Bob grilled us a fabulous flank steak one night and some delicious pork the next. Served with his home-brewed beer- what could be better!

And as if that weren’t enough- Lynn topped it off with one of her amazing berry pies with berries fresh from their own yard.

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I was absolutely spoiled. And I loved every minute of it.

Mosaics are time intensive- and even with the 5 of us working we weren’t able to finish the last fish before I made my way back down the trail to Talent.

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Luckily she had some more great workers with her the next week-Richard Davis and Jennifer Kuhns. Both experienced mosaic artists in their own rights, they whipped through the last of the fish and moved onto the water before their three days were up.

In addition, Richard whipped up some fabulous gourmet meals using his culinary background as a chef. The photos I saw on Lynn’s blog looked good enough to eat!

Now I am geared up for my next mosaic session with Lynn. It’s round two and I’m determined to just “knock it out of the park”-as Lynn might say. You who know her know she is a HUGE baseball fan. It warms my heart just thinking about her checking the scores throughout the days-keeping tabs on her Giants on the laptop as she toils away 🙂

Paul’s mosaic panels are completed

After I created this exterior mosaic mirror to coordinate with my client’s new interior furnishings, he was so pleased he commissioned two more pieces for the entry walkway to his home.

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Paul’s mosaic mirror created in January 2013.

He lives in a beautiful complex on the shore of the bay in Tampa, Florida and has a walkway bridge that leads to his screened in porch and front door. The mirror hangs on his  porch.

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I created two panels that played off of his mosaic mirror design, as well as bringing in some new textures.

These panels were a combination of the original mirror, and the address plaque I made for my friend Penelope earlier this year, in my post “Penelope’s Plaque”.

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Address plaque created for Penelope in early 2013.

The client liked Penelope’s panel and wanted something similar, but in the same palette as his mirror and the colors from his home.

Here’s what we decided to do- one panel with 2 circles (12″ x 24″), and one panel with 3 circles (12″ x 36″). He left the rest up to me and here are the results:

Paul's2circle

Paul’s 2 circle panel.

Paul's3circles

Paul’s 3 circle panel.

These pieces include stained glass, handmade and commercial ceramic tile, mirror, commercial vitreous mosaic tiles, iridescent tiles, glass beads, millifiori, and Italian smalti left over from the Hannon Library mosaic installed in Ashland, Oregon in 2005.

I tied these panels to the mirror by making the background the same, as well as carrying over the color schemes. I feel they were pretty successful and also fun to make.

I find abstracts much more relaxing to create than realistic work. My mind is focused on the basics and not on “does it look like ___?” or not. I can allow myself to let go and play more. I have a feeling I’ll be going more in this direction in the future.

Anyhow, I’m shipping these panels out tomorrow and I look forward to seeing the photos once they’re installed on the pillars. Let me know what you think, feel, etc. about this work or anything else on my blog.

Finally Finished! “Mosaic Town” photos

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The sculptural grouping that is “Mosaic Town” in situ on 8th St. in Ashland, OR. July 2013

Here are the final photos for my mosaic town project, just completed days ago. These pieces are ready to live in your garden or can be gifted to a friend or loved one. They’re on my website at missmosaic.com if you’d like more information about how to make them yours. They went to visit the garden of my friends Steve and Martha, who were gracious enough to host them for the afternoon shoot. Their shady moist garden was a much better place for them to be shown than my dried up piece of lawn. It’s hot out there this week!

For larger and much clearer views of the photos- just click on one and it’ll open in another window for you.

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Front side view of Little House

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Front side view of Office Building

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Front side view of 2 Story House

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Right side view of Mod Building

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Left side view of Mod Building

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Front side view of the Cinema Building

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Back side view of the Cinema Building

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Another view of Mosaic Town- coming to a garden near you?

Just imagine how happy these will make you every time you go outside!

I create custom work too, so if there’s a particular style, color, or idea you have, let me know. I enjoy making my customers happy!

The care and feeding of your new town is easy. Just keep them inside during freezing temperatures and they will last forever (as long as you don’t drop them on a hard surface). They are fine in rain and heat, and not nearly as heavy as you might think. Check out my previous blogs for all the construction photos and insights into mosaic and tile projects in general. And stay tuned to this station for more adventures in mosaics. Soon I’m starting another couple pieces to go with my mosaic mirror made back in January (for Tampa, FL), and I will also be making several trips up to the Portland, OR area to help out on a public mosaic project for Astoria, OR! I’m excited. Woot woot!

Mosaic Town is growing

Mosaic town has been growing steadily over the past week, and is almost complete. I have added three new buildings and created several montage photos so you can see the process as well as the various views of the new buildings.

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This is the 2 Story House made of handmade ceramic tile with a glass mosaic tile roof.

I created the texture on the red tile by rolling the wet clay onto a sheet of deeply textured fabric, then lifting and repositioning the fabric and rolling it again. The glaze catches in the different depths of the texture, causing some areas to have deeper colors than others.

The little yellow swirls are left over sun-centers from my History Underfoot mosaic. They make me happy, and I wanted a happy home- so there they are!

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The next building to be created was the Mod Building. Not sure where this came from in my head, though the Price Tower by Frank Lloyd Wright, in my hometown in Oklahoma, has always been a big influence. It might be a residence, it might be an office, it’s up to your imagination.

This one is covered in three colors of handmade tile, sea foam and clear with a touch of green for the walls, and forest green for the roof areas. The windows are made of a painted glass that adds great depth, as well as suggesting an interior light source.

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The final building I see as a Theatre of some sort. Cinema probably, though could be a regular theatre too.

It is covered in a huge array of colors and textures I have had sitting in my studio for a couple of years now. The front and sides are in a bright cheerful yellow, with the back being made of a combination of red and textured red handmade tiles.

The decorative tiles around the doors and windows are bits from tiles that warped or cracked in the kiln, but I didn’t want to throw away. The roof is made of orange tile and orange/brown tile from a failed attempt at a platter. I used the platter edges to edge the front of the roof. Oh, and the gingko leaf on the back is cut from the same failed platter. Happy it found a home here.

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So the town is now complete. I grouted them today, and as soon as I can find the appropriate garden setting I’ll photograph them to post here, and they’ll be up for grabs by some lucky new owner. Of course they need to live indoors in the winter to prolong their lifespan, but what a fun way to decorate your home!

TOWN FOR SALE